• Beatles as Women Comment by Michelle on May 17, 17:32 I agree there are better pictures of John they could have used for a base than the pale, gaunt, hair parted down the middle, granny glasses wearing WA version of him. But I find it interesting that everyone says, as if by default, that Paul makes the best woman. To me, George is the clear winner here. Pauline looks like every stuck-up girl I knew in high school.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by matthew sergiou on May 16, 18:59 @ Tamisin: “Matt, I read your response to me on the recent posts page, but it’s not appearing on the story here. Anyway, thanks for the time line of George and Lewisohns meeting. I agree that George could have been hesitant to speak more with Lewisohn at that time, due to Lewisohns work with Paul. I think the lawsuits between the Beatles were still going on, and also, Paul had refused to appear at the Beatles induction to the R&R Hall of Fame in ‘88. So, there was some tension definitely between George and Paul. That’s why I wanted to know the time line, because by the time Anthology was completed, I think the two men (P & G) had buried the hatchet. At least that’s what I have read.” Thanks for the reply, Tamsin, and yeah, I never factored in the infamous R&R Hall of Fame incident in ’88 when Paul didn’t attend but all the others did. I dunno though, did George really bury the hatchet with Paul after Anthology? When I watch the footage of ‘the Threetles’ talking together in the Anthology, I always get the impression that George was being a bit tense and – dare I express(?) – ‘pissy’ towards Paul. However, George could be a bit that way with any one, and he did have a bit of a light-hearted jibe at Ringo too in the Anthology – something about older guys and their hair dye.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by matthew sergiou on May 16, 18:35 @ Harry Thornton: “I know Mark Lewisohn’s trying to create his own library of the many documents etc. he’s using for in his biography series, just to make it easier. Were the Beatles to open an archive, that’d be a great starting point.” Hi Harry. From what I recall in an interview or two, Lewisohn did say he has made arrangements for all his Beatles research material (documents, etc) to be donated on his passing to – I think he’s said – the British Library in London.
  • Beatles as Women Comment by Michelle on May 15, 23:12 It wouldn’t have happened in 1957. But even if it happened today, they would be forced to give birth to hundreds of babies.
  • Hey Dullblog Online Housekeeping Note Comment by Hologram Sam on May 15, 14:36 I haven’t had any issues since that one morning when the “Linda on keyboards” post attempted an automatic download of something I couldn’t identify. Similar things are happening across the web. I don’t know why. For a few weeks all disqus powered blogs were infested with bots that automatically and instantly upvoted every comment, in addition to leaving the usual “I was sad when I lost my job but then I found this surefire way to make thousands of dollars every week on my computer” spam. HeyDullBlog looks great and I love all the features. I’m glad to see the “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards” post is full of comments without anyone mentioning glitches. I admire the way our bloghost (like the mayor of a frontier town where some cattle have been stricken holds up a cup of well water to the worried population while intoning “Observe! No ill effects as I drink deeply!”) has set an example that it’s safe to poke around here again.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 15, 12:20 Yes, and a great payday for a man who surely deserves one!
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 15, 12:19 No, no, no. Following the death of all the principals, their heirs license the catalog to some huge ass corporation (I bet it will be Disney), in exchange for an ungodly sum. To keep more of that money, they donate archives and effects to a tax-deductible foundation, affiliated with and run by a major research university. Which would then be run by scholars. The donors, having donated and been well compensated for doing so, would have no direct control—though surely their wishes would be a non-zero factor, as with any donors.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by notorious_g_i_b on May 15, 11:53 So… an archive run by a fresh committee, then? A new four-must-agree situation, with the new assigns being those who are employed by each slice, and the “how” being their mutual decision?
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Michelle on May 15, 10:37 Well, anything with John wearing that suede jacket is sexy. Including the non-distorted version of the cover of Rubber Soul: https://medium.com/rubber-souls/in-praise-of-the-unedited-rubber-soul-cover-shot-dce7290da0cd I think in ’65 they both looked incredible. I’m partial to this picture (Robert Whitaker is the photographer, if I’m not mistaken), and if you like smoking and working… [just forget it’s for a Christmas special] https://64.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m7k4m0lBO11qhnkvco3_640.jpg
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Harry Thornton on May 14, 23:40 I know Mark Lewisohn’s trying to create his own library of the many documents etc. he’s using for in his biography series, just to make it easier. Were the Beatles to open an archive, that’d be a great starting point.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 14, 17:46 @Neal, I think the problem is probably that each of the four Beatles/estates have their own ideas about how/who to employ. The last Beatle standing may have the most leverage. As long as the collection is combined, and preserved, the jockeying will recede into the past. But yes, Erin (who used to comment here) is precisely the kind of scholar who would put such an archive to its best use, and surely deserves all the fellowships and visiting scholar positions that could be created. Devin McKinney, too.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 14, 17:40 This is specifically what the Beatles SHOULDN’T do. They should not sell their materials to an individual or corporation. They should create a foundation, which they control, affiliate with a major research university, and realize “gains” from the charitable donations offsetting their income. I am sure there are lots of meetings being held at Apple and within the families to try to sort all this out. The best scenario would be a Getty-like foundation centered at Friar Park, London, New York, or Liverpool. The worst would be each Beatle’s archives being sold to a separate person, with a hundred years before someone recollected all the materials under one roof. That’s how stuff gets lost.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Tasmin on May 14, 11:42 Speaking of libraries/museums, I recently read Bob Dylan has opened one. Well, the millionaire he sold his archives to, did. “The Bob Dylan Center is a museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma dedicated to the life and works of American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. The museum opened to the public on May 10, 2022. In 2016, Dylan sold his archive to the Tulsa-based George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa. Wikipedia” I guess the Beatles could do something like this; or their heirs. I just don’t see Paul being keen to sell the Beatles archives. It’s complicated.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michelle on May 14, 11:29 Reshaping history in his own image. Yes, I can see that. Best to leave it to impartial scholars who are unconcerned about their own legacy.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 14, 09:16 @Nancy, my guess is that the 50th or the various LPs, plus Get Back, represents the final flash of cash. What’s left to monetize? I think when Paul and Ringo die, they’ll sell the catalog, and get all the money without the hassle of management. At that point, I would expect they’d all be facing a massive tax bill, and donating papers and effects would be a great way to defray that. So I actually think financial concerns might be the primary driver of setting up a dedicated museum/institute. @Faith, all the Beatles have generated MOUNTAINS of paper documents, easily as much as (for example) the JFK Museum in Boston, for example. There are teams of footage, tapes that need preservation,a mountain of memorabilia in private collections which will all be looking for a home after the Boomers die and it becomes much less saleable. As to an online archive, any library of this type would digitize portions of its collection, and that would be a good thing. But putting something online is the opposite of preserving it, since most tech is proprietary and changes. Libraries endlessly fret that the archives of authors who wrote after the advent of computers are partially inaccessible now because (for example) the disk format used by the Timex-Sinclair word processor in 1984 is no longer made. Plus, the point of a museum/library/collection for a popular subject like this isn’t to give everyone with an internet connection access to Paul’s private correspondence. It’s to spur scholarly research in the topic, and prevent the kind of deepfake nonsense that is coming. It’s not a question as to whether someone will control the Beatles’ story in 50 years—only whether it’s an academic-style institution, with clear intents and little profit motive, or a billionaire crank with an agenda, or some group of websites that leverage an attractive story for clicks. Of those three, I think the first is preferable. The internet is demonstrating daily that “citizen scholarship” is usually of very low quality, fundamentally narcissistic, and uncheckable because of its vast quantity. We already have free access ti an amount of primary sources, and people are simply making whatever story they wish. They will always do that, but I for one would take some comfort in knowing that in 500 years, the story won’t simply be what was loudest or most titillating.
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Hologram Sam on May 14, 07:30 I’m curious. For those of you who have returned to seeing concerts like Paul and his duet with projected John, what is the covid policy? Were attendees required to present proof of vaccination? Were audience members masked? I haven’t been much of a concert goer for decades now, so I don’t know how covid is being treated. My wife and I have always worn N95 masks whenever we’re in a public indoor setting, and we’re both double-boosted. But we both got sick from exposure at home. Our offspring and offspring fiance (whose job is working with children) moved in upstairs and they brought the virus home. We caught it by simply sharing the front door, even though we live separately in a 2-family house. I remember the interview with Paul and Taylor Swift that was linked here about a year ago. They talked about the virus in the past tense. I know live concerts are an important income stream nowadays for these artists, but I’m just curious how fans are dealing with the risk.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Faith on May 14, 05:29 I’ve been thinking about this and I’m realizing, what would even be in the library? It’s not like a presidential library where there are a lot of papers other than lyrics and studio logs. I wonder if a better idea might be an online archive? It could include all of those things, plus it could include transcripts and links to oral stories, which is probably mostly what there would be. Photos of memorabilia and such. That seems a lot more doable and it would be a lot more accessible as well.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Faith on May 13, 19:48 I wouldn’t be averse to this one as an alternative/addition, but I have yet to find a print version of this one, or the book in which it appears…. http://faithmichelecurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/22289663_10155923368293313_5108648376500074579_o.jpg It doiesn’t have the sex appeal or edge, but it’s still a favorite.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Faith on May 13, 19:40 I’ve never liked the Bailey session. Maybe it’s because I’m a former fashion photographer, but to me the posing feels awkward and forced. Neither of them (to me) look comfortable with one another or with Bailey, who as I recall said that the session was tense. (though I do love, so much that I can hardly stand it, that John had that photo on his wall, though, and that Paul has one of the two of them working on the Abbey Road medley on his wall at Cavendish.) What is it about the other one that I covet? First, that it’s them composing — I’m a songwriter, so that has particular power for me as inspiration in my studio. I like that there’s an avant garde feel to it. I love the cigarette — they both looked SO sexy smoking… I love John looking at Paul the way he does. I love Paul staring at the camera with his insolent “bugger off, we’re working” look. I love everything about it. And does it go without saying that they both look sexy as hell? But I’ve discovered it appears in a Beatles photo book (thanks to @Christine) and that it’s a crop of a wide shot, so tragically, it’s unlikely I’ll ever get the high res print of the crop that I long for. So instead, I settled for this, which I made myself out of two individual portraits from a Beatles photo book. http://faithmichelecurrent.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/IMG_20220418_180413-01-scaled.jpeg It’s not ideal — I’d much rather than the two of them together in one photo and writing together — but it gets pretty close to the vibe of the original.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Michelle on May 13, 12:52 Haha, you’re welcome Water Falls. They brought out the best in each other, in more ways than one!
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Nancy Carr on May 13, 07:50 I love the idea of a library like this, but I wonder if McCartney would rather see Apple (whatever coalition of the Beatles and their wives and heirs) do this as a joint project. If he spearheaded it I think he’d be accused by some people of “taking over,” and it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s wary of that. Really I hope Apple/the families will do something like this before it’s too late. But the profit motive for everyone is powerful, and I don’t know how closely the various representatives see their interests aligning. Reading Peter Doggett’s You Never Give Me Your Money was a powerfully depressing look at the details of all that.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Dave on May 12, 21:11 I’ve always been a huge fan if Linda’s, really every guy needs someone like her by their side. Paul wanted the wife, mother, that close knit quaint traditional family (basically what he sings about in Obla Di Obla Da, When I’m 64) but he also was a performer and who was eager to get out in front of crowds again, soak up the adulation, and prove himself as a solo performer…and he wanted to take that whole idyllic family that he always wanted down from Cambletown and take it on the road with him. He wanted to be the present, involved dad who doesnt miss a thing, as well as the legendary touring rock star. That’s a lot to ask of Linda(and on top of it all her having to learn and perform live), even with all the $ in the world being able to ease the stresses and strains of life on the road as a family. How many people could make it happen for Paul as Linda did? Not many. She was a remarkable woman
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Neal on May 12, 19:20 @Michael I second your motion for a library. Paul could, and very much should, make the call for a center of scholarship and a repository of pertinent material. I know I beat this drum all too frequently, but Paul needs to realize that his legacy has spilled the banks far beyond just him as a person/artist and that scholars, researchers, and skilled musical and cultural writers should have a place to gather and study what he put in motion all those years ago. We are at that important 50 year passage of time that allows a broad view of the events. Organizing as much material as possible in one place would obviously benefit scholars in their work of unpacking those events and their lasting influences. Second. I know that there are young scholars (Erin Weber among others for example) who are applying rigorous methods to the study of the four, the musical and cultural seas in which they swam, and their respective solo and collective legacies. Not only should these scholars be encouraged in their pursuits, but equally important they should be supported. A fellowship or visiting scholar position at a library or research center would be one way in which to do this. Perhaps my frustration in this area is misplaced, but we know of many famous and wealthy individuals who claim to be ardent Beatles fans. Paul could, seemingly, work with them to start a library– all he has to do is to put out the call. Am I missing something in asking if it can really be that hard or is he simply not cognizant of how broad and deep the influences that he and his colleagues had and still have? Your point is well made that this idea probably did not have purchase within the academy because the study of “pop” was shunned for any number of reasons. Yet in 2022 one would hope that these reasons no longer have purchase as we now have 50 years of deep cultural and musical threads to unpack. The time is now Sir Paul. I admire that you are still bringing great joy to audiences, but there is one more thing that you could do for history’s sake and that is to bequeath a library.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Water Falls on May 12, 14:20 Lord/Lady have mercy! Thanks for the eye feast, Michelle. That Baily pic of PaulandJohn, and JohnandPaul…Beautiful! I see why John had it on his studio wall. It’s stunning and packs a punch. Just look at them. Both looking back at me… (& y’all too)… with unblinking, unflinching, gorgeousness and sex appeal that transcends space and time. They are both… just…”So Fine!”, (as mine would say), “Somebody turn on the air, it’s getting hot in here”! Pardon my objectifying these two human beings, it’s noteworthy to mention that they wrote, played, and sang great songs too, that made and still make a lot of people happy, but Lady/Lord…Have Mercy!
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 11, 22:09 If anybody close to Paul is reading this site: go tell him. Make a library; make it in London or Liverpool or New York or at Friar Park…
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Michael Gerber on May 11, 22:04 I think John envied Paul for knowing what he liked and needed — Paul loves to perform. John moved restlessly from thing to thing to thing, and not being able to change his restlessness, made it into a virtue. I don’t know if it is one or not.
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Michael Gerber on May 11, 22:02 Extrapolating from what it was like in mid-1980, I think the appetite for a Beatles reunion in 1990 would’ve been ravenous. Remember, the Stones had been *together* for all those years; people’s fatigue came from a surfeit, a group that was producing one good LP out of every five tries. Even in the 80s it was pretty clear that The Stones had said all they could say, and given all they had to give. The Beatles were a different kettle of fish, much bigger much broader much deeper, artistically, in the Sixties, and after. There was a magical quality to the Beatles story — including when and how they’d broken up — that hung around until December 9, 1980. And until then there was a sense that when they’d get back together it would be the right time. They would remain blessed. I also think that The Beatles type of music was so different, it would’ve been able to age. J/P/G/R could’ve continued to grow and develop (and even diverge), as they’d been doing since 1965. The only data I see here is Anthology — was it a HUGE deal? Yes, indeed it was. Did it disappoint? No, it did not. As to what they might’ve put out, remember that White and LIB and even Abbey Road had their detractors when they were released. I don’t think reviews would’ve bothered them in the least; I do think that they would’ve felt the pressure, especially John and Paul.
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Tasmin on May 11, 17:43 Thanks. I never knew there was a difference. Here’s the difference for others who don’t know: “A vegan diet excludes all meat and animal products (meat, poultry, fish, seafood, dairy and eggs), whereas a vegetarian diet excludes meat, poultry, fish and seafood. However, there are a few variations of a vegetarian diet that depend on whether you eat or exclude eggs, dairy and fish.”
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by notorious_g_i_b on May 11, 07:37 If I may… vegetarian. He’s not vegan, except if one counts where the two lifestyles overlap. Even cleared that up in a Wired AutoComplete interview recently (I’ve fast-forwarded to the relevant question).
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Michelle on May 11, 06:45 What is it about this photo that you just have to have? The gorgeous photo below is what John had on the wall of his studio. Maybe go with that? https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wikOl4qzjPk/XypLXPDakeI/AAAAAAAD2kM/55W5hmsZ9xA3oT5Pm4NijQVZUMk73NG3ACLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/john-paul-by-david-bailey-1.jpg
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Dave on May 10, 22:42 I’ve thought a bit about had Lennon made it to at least the year 2000 (60 years old) what would the publics appetite for a Beatles reunion just continue to grow and grow through the 80s and 90s? Would it have become so overwhelming that they would’ve done it just to shut everyone up?(or an event comes along like Live Aid where the forces and pressure to reunite for a cause is too massive to run from, and the stage is too great If it’s 1990, 20 years after, and the 4 of them still havent been in the same room together since 1969, and they’re all between 47-50… I wonder if the general public would finally stop caring so much. Right around that time the Stones were getting kicked around a bit for being old, Steel Wheelchairs tour etc. once the Beatles hit a certain age I think some folks would start gravitating towards wanting them to stay apart and having their historical legacy together be one centered around youth and and prolific music. Them reuniting and putting out something considered mediocre or just “good”, where they’re no longer the best band in the world, would’ve been intolerable for them. How much different would the Anthology Project be? If it even gets off the ground.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Christine on May 10, 14:46 You’re welcome! Sorry that site’s a dud, but good luck finding it elsewhere!
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Dave on May 10, 13:38 When I saw him at Citi Field in 09 I was stunned at how much of the load he carried at 66. Didn’t think at all he would still be doing this at this pace at close to 80. He’s just one of those guys who has to be “in the game” a true workaholic who always needs to prove himself, and really loves what he does. In a lot of ways…I kind of wish I could be like that I remember hearing the old showbiz line in some interviews with John where he may have spoken of Paul being that…or turning into that. I didnt know what it meant. I guess to John there was something unseemly, possibly inauthentic about the way post Beatle Paul went about. He saw him as the performing flea who needed the adulation. John of course claimed he didnt need the same (he did, just in different way) but it almost seemed to me that John was trying to paint Paul as being juvenile for still pursuing the old showbiz/touring route in his 30s when he no longer needed it.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Faith on May 9, 13:22 Thank you, Christine. I had checked that site and didn’t see that photo because I was looking for the cropped image and scanned too quickly. The good news is I now at least know the details. The bad news is that they don’t seem to have prints available, despite the link and it looks like something of a dead/bogus website. (Note the placeholder titles for pages that come with a free wordpress site… I sent a message, but I’m skeptical anything will come of it. That said, THANK YOU for digging it up. At least now when I keep looking through photo books, I have a better idea of which ones might contain that picture.
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Tasmin on May 9, 13:05 Nancy, I agree with everything you said, especially this: “ I think McCartney needs a strong structure he hews to in order to make doing a show manageable for him on an emotional level.” As someone who suffers from an anxiety disorder, I know structure makes me feel in control and safe. I would imagine Paul feels the same. “That McCartney is still doing shows of this intensity at close to 80 years old is amazing.” Everyone who called into the program said the same. They were all amazed he played 3 hours, and looked and sounded good. He is a walking advertisement for being vegan! 😉
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Christine on May 9, 12:40 According to the Facebook page The Beatles Recording (https://www.facebook.com/BeatlesRecording/photos?tab=albums) — which has a trove of photos of the group at sessions, organized by date — this photo was taken on November 3, 1965, while they were recording Michelle. See an uncropped version here: https://www.facebook.com/BeatlesRecording/photos/a.678936245559919/2191989554254573 And many other photos from the same session: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.678936245559919&type=3 That FB page points to this site as a source, and they do offer prints for sale: http://www.beatlesbookphotolibrary.com/?fbclid=IwAR2MaaQW7pqyJ-kCRL1oHzIEAXoe1jnIKS2SNcE32LxMG5EiAeH8ANwXHz4 The photo you want is the first one on this page: http://www.beatlesbookphotolibrary.com/session/l621-emi-studios-november-1965/page/2/ Request prints here: http://www.beatlesbookphotolibrary.com/image-enquiry/?user=0&type=1
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Nancy Carr on May 9, 11:40 Tasmin, I think we’re seeing this in a similar way. I believe that McCartney both means what he says/does in those tributes and that they are very carefully crafted and thought out. A part of that thinking out is definitely his recognition that this may be the only time some fans see a show of his — that’s a part of “old showbiz” that I find admirable. I may have said this on a comment thread before, but one of the aspects of my job is giving training presentations. I always mean what I say, and I don’t have a script that I’m following tightly, but there are absolutely things I repeat almost word for word in many courses I teach. That’s because I know those familiar phrases work to get a point across, and because they enable me to save some bandwidth to pay attention to other things that are happening or modifications I need to make for a particular group. I cannot imagine what it’s like to get up and perform for tens of thousands of people who have bought expensive tickets to see you specifically and who have strong expectations of what they want to experience. I think McCartney needs a strong structure he hews to in order to make doing a show manageable for him on an emotional level. When I went to see Ringo Starr back in 2018, the difference between his and McCartney’s shows really struck me. Starr performs with an “all-star” group who each take the spotlight and sing at different points, and he also left the stage altogether for a brief break about midway through. He’s clearly distributing the weight of carrying the show in a way McCartney isn’t; McCartney sings and plays an instrument for every song, takes no breaks, and plays for over two hours. Also, the place where I saw Starr seats 3600 people, while the place I saw McCartney seats over 40,000. (The venues are in the same metro area.) That McCartney is still doing shows of this intensity at close to 80 years old is amazing.
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Tasmin on May 9, 09:25 @Nancy and Dave, I have to jump in because yesterday I was driving home from visiting my Aunt, and was listening to the Beatles Channel. There’s a program called Fab Forum, which is hosted by 2 Beatles experts. Anyway, they were taking calls from people who had been to see Paul’s recent concerts, and getting feedback about Paul singing “I’ve Got A Feeling”with John. The people who called said it was a very emotional moment, as Dave shared. People loved it, and cried. The hosts said they were skeptical when they heard about it, but the feedback from people has been mostly positive. Paul was singing from his heart, and it didn’t seem contrived. They also made the point that when Paul makes his set list, he has to figure there will be people there who are seeing him for maybe the first time, as well as people who have seen him multiple times. So, he has to please a variety of fans. I personally have seen him 3 times (not on his current tour) and each time he sang “Here, Today”, and “Something”, I teared up. I felt Paul was sharing his feelings; a part of his soul. It never felt “staged”. I agree with Nancy on this, “Overall, I think he’s doing what he’s able to do — and I mean that both artistically and emotionally.”
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Michelle on May 9, 09:03 This could be made better, and lighten the mood, if Paul introduces him as “an old estranged fiancé of mine”…
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Nancy Carr on May 9, 07:25 Dave, that mixed reaction about those tributes McCartney does in concert is similar to my own feelings about it. I think the rehearsed element is what enables him to get through it; it’s a kind of distancing technique. It’s a dance of acknowledging what he owes to Lennon and Harrison while not revealing too much. McCartney is also “old showbiz” enough that he invests a lot in putting on a show that won’t disappoint fans. At the same time, that showbiz element can make things feel too polished and stagey. Overall, I think he’s doing what he’s able to do — and I mean that both artistically and emotionally.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Nancy Carr on May 9, 07:21 Matt, I think you’re highlighting the Catch-22 embedded in projects like this: only someone who cares deeply about the person/group being studied is going to take on such a project, and such investment always produces some amount of bias. In the best cases where the effort is being made to produce an objective history, the author is aware of their biases and also has outside readers who can draw attention to places where it’s showing up.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Faith on May 8, 18:31 @It might be worth someone putting together a proposal and approaching Paul with it. He cares deeply about preserving the history, it seems, and now that LIPA is up and running, he needs another tax deduction… A Beatles library, the equivalent of a presidential library (because they were more influential than the vast majority , if not all, American presidents) I think that would have a great deal of appeal for Sir Paul…
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Faith on May 8, 18:27 Thank, Neal. Yeah, for all kinds of reasons it feels like Rubber Soul. Now I just have to FIND the thing in print so I can frame it in my studio… I suppose I’ll keep buying Beatles photo books… oh, the inhumanity of being forced to look at photo upon photo of Paul and John…. LOL
  • Beatles in the 1970s: Melting and Crying Comment by Dave on May 8, 06:47 I saw McCartney in concert with my wife recently in Seattle. Have to say…I did tear up. She was absolutely bawling, not only was she a John fan, her mother was a huge Lennon fangirl and at Shea in 65. It was an extremely emotional powerful moment. You lose yourself in it. And I was sort of thinking the other day…every Tour Paul works into his show a tribute to John, a tribute to George, specifically designed to coax these tears out. For the people that only get to see him once every 5 years or so (and dont rummage on youtube) it’s a nice, touching, reach for the kleenex moment) for Paul though it must seem kind of strange. Every night going through these tear jerkers…if you did something like this once during a concert, or during a Grammy performance, and never again then it would be remembered as a special performance. As a fan going to see McCartney (maybe I’m in them minority) I wouldnt be upset walking out of the show if he never once mentioned George or John. I would never expect this out of Paul or anyone really. Part of me just feels Something on the Uke, or I’ve got a feeling with John…that’s really special and it’s not something you pull out of the bag every night. Another part of me is thinking how nice it is that there’s a 70 year old Beatlemaniac going to a show this month who is going to get the surprise of her life when John pops up during the first encore
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Michael Gerber on May 7, 17:12 @Matt, I quite agree with all of this, and it’s a large part of why I think the topic should be studied systematically, not by a single researcher under great pressure to “earn out” his advance.
  • Essential Beatles Reference Books Comment by Neal on May 7, 08:50 @Faith I think you might be very close on your conclusion that your picture comes from the Rubber Soul recording. I uploaded another picture from the book that I labeled “Paul Rubber Soul.” I admit the quality is poor, but if one looks closely one can see that Paul is wearing the same high-collar/turtleneck shirt in both pictures. The one I posted with Paul and the two Georges is stated as being during the Rubber Soul recordings. Also, if you look at Paul’s hair, there is a great deal of similarity. A small point I know, but their styles changed subtlety every couple of months or so and in these two pics they look the same. Would my guess hold up in a court of law? Perhaps not, but I just see a great deal that makes me think these two photos were taken within a month, if not closer, of each other. btw, I also put a picture of Mick Jagger in their who is doing a cracking good impression of Boris Johnson 50 years before Bojo became PM–cuffed links, hair, and facial expressions included!
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Matt on May 6, 19:49 @Michael Gerber This has been touched on here before, but Lewisohn is also much too invested as a Beatles fan to write a truly objective history (In the next volume, can he please stop calling Ringo ‘Richie’ as though they were best friends?) You can already feel the conflict developing in Volume 1 as he struggles to redact the legend of John Lennon pissing on nuns from the rooftop. Lewisohn does not want to write anything truly negative, and given the darker, more unsavoury undercurrents of the Beatles story as it progresses, it means that you have a fascinating, if less palatable, aspect of their history glossed over or just completely left to gather dust. Maybe Lennon really didn’t piss on those nuns, but as a reader, I was less convinced by the actuality than Lewisohn’s obvious desire to retract an infamous episode for mass consumption. Certainly, I see the value in Lewisohn’s project, and I really want to see him get through the next two volumes. I’m just wary of them being labeled as the definitive last word and all else being relegated to apocrypha.
  • “I’m going to go with Linda on keyboards.” Comment by Tasmin on May 6, 18:36 @Matt, I read your response to me on the recent posts page, but it’s not appearing on the story here. Anyway, thanks for the time line of George and Lewisohns meeting. I agree that George could have been hesitant to speak more with Lewisohn at that time, due to Lewisohns work with Paul. I think the lawsuits between the Beatles were still going on, and also, Paul had refused to appear at the Beatles induction to the R&R Hall of Fame in ‘88. So, there was some tension definitely between George and Paul. That’s why I wanted to know the time line, because by the time Anthology was completed, I think the two men (P & G) had buried the hatchet. At least that’s what I have read.
  • Hey Dullblog Online Housekeeping Note Comment by Neal on May 6, 17:30 As of yesterday, 5 May, I no longer encountered the problem so if he did make a tweak it did work. I probably should have been more specific when I first mentioned it in case others notice(d) it. Oddly, on this browser running on a Samsung tablet, it was occuring only on the times after I had cleared the cache, cookies, and all other artifacts of a browsing session. This led me to believe the re-direct was looking to see if it had already dropped a cookie. If not, then it would run the code. Second, it occurred a few months ago but then no sign of it until a couple of weeks ago. I’ll keep an eye open for it and if it re-occurs I will grab a screen shot and as many other diagnostics as possible. Thank you very much for looking into this as your tech rep is correct in saying that it can be a user issue just as much as something embedded on the site.
  • The Merseybeat gang, circa 1962 Comment by Michelle on May 6, 17:20 This is adorable: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3f/b0/47/3fb047042716ee4d269a7620536c52f2.jpg