• Beatle Cars Comment by Justin McCann on Jun 11, 03:49 Haha! Love it Annie.
  • Interview with Jay Goeppner of the the Beatle Brothers Comment by andycason cason on Jun 10, 17:31 dear jay geopppner iam going tooseethe band american english at ablock party in rollling medows doyou have anony shows comeing up and do have the batle car your friend andy
  • BB King, 1925-2015 Comment by Jules on Jun 7, 12:15 Live in Japan is actually my favourite B.B. King album. It’s much longer than Live at the Regal, has a fat, warm mix, features one of his best bands and contains some of his best improvisations.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Sally on Jun 6, 12:51 I recently listened to an interview with Eirik the Norwegian, the mixing engineer who was heavily involved in the making of Ram, and he says during the sessions Paul was already talking about putting a band together and going on the road. So I think some version of Wings was inevitable. It is an intriguing question though. The full interview is on the One Sweet Dream podcast, it’s a great listen. He’s very charming and it even had some new (to me!) details!
  • Speaking ill of the dead: Phil Spector Comment by Hologram Sam on Jun 6, 07:26 Actor Ruairi O’Connor has opened up about playing Buddy Holly in forthcoming biopic Clear Lake. The rising actor, currently starring opposite Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson in The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, told NME that the new film is set to start shooting this autumn. “It tells the story of him on the cusp of fame, all the way through his ill-fated ‘Tour of Stars’ to dying in a plane crash,” O’Connor said. “I almost feel strange saying that, as if it’s gauche. It’s been like 60 years, maybe it’s okay to talk about it. I’m terrified of flying as well, so that’s not going to help.” O’Connor also said that he will be singing and playing guitar himself in the film. “I’ve been playing guitar for years, writing really bad music for slightly less years, so it’s going to be great to get up on stage and pretend I wrote these incredible songs. “I’ve just become obsessed with the Beatles again and you think they are the start of everything, and then you realise how much they drew from Buddy Holly. So it’s really exciting – the birth of rock and roll.” https://www.nme.com/en_au/news/film/buddy-holly-biopic-ruairi-oconnor-clear-lake-2954587
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Kristy on Jun 3, 17:38 I saw your comment, @Hologram Sam, and it keeps making me think of my father’s old Bonac accent that he lost living in the US Midwest. My cousins and I discussed the dying of the old guard at our father’s funerals and bemoaned the fact that our dads grew up in a culture that had lasted for hundreds of years and is now being swept away. The Bonacker accent is described a little in this article about The Bonac, which is basically the area around East Hampton, on Long Island in New York. . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonackers . When I found the Wiki article I was thrilled, because it basically described everything my father had ever told me about growing up in Springs. My grandfather was a fisherman and farmer just as described. . To make this Beatles-related, once on a trip to the Bonac my cousin drove me by Paul McCartney’s mansion in East Hampton.
  • Rundgren v. the Beatles Comment by Greig Dymond on May 29, 18:19 Rundgren dishes some dirt on his personal encounters with each of the Fabs in this interview: “Interview: Todd Rundgren on John Lennon, Ringo Starr, New York Dolls and more | Louder” https://www.loudersound.com/features/interview-todd-rundgren-on-john-lennon-ringo-starr-new-york-dolls-and-more Clearly, Rundgren’s anti-Lennon’s missives didn’t poison the waters with Ringo, who hired him to play in one of the All-Starr Band configurations.
  • Eddie Cochran Documentary on Arena Comment by Hologram Sam on May 28, 10:49 I found an old comment I left here 10 years ago, and I decided to resurrect it for this thread: As a lifelong fan of the Marx Brothers, I recently stumbled upon a tribute website to Harpo, put together by Harpo’s son Bill (who is a musician/songwriter). I sent him an email full of questions about Harpo. (For example, I didn’t know that Harpo actually played harp on a Mahalia Jackson recording in 1961!) I was curious about Harpo’s opinion about Rock ‘n Roll, specifically Elvis, Eddie Cochran, The Everlys, Buddy Holly. He was gracious enough to send this reply: “Thanks so much for checking in. Dad passed away in 1964. A year prior, he told me that the Beatles would be the biggest R&R act in the world. He was incredibly perceptive about and very open to all kinds of music, and because I was with the same record label as Eddie Cochran, we heard a lot of him around the house. I am so glad you have a love for dad and his brothers. It is much appreciated. Best of the best, Bill Marx.”
  • More Beatle Cars! Comment by Hologram Sam on May 28, 07:32 I suspect I’m being unreasonable as I type this, but I’ll continue. And thus I’ve achieved Peak Internet Commenter status.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Hologram Sam on May 28, 06:41 This reminds me of bit of British slang some Americans might not be aware of: To “arrive” is slang for “to cum” or ejaculate. This gives Harrison’s line in When We Was Fab, “Arrived like strangers in the night” a double meaning. Most American listeners assumed he meant traveling from town to town on tour. Well it does, but…
  • Nilsson’s "Isolation" Comment by Paul Dunn on May 26, 18:04 “whatever you think of Barbra Streisand’s music” Barbra Joan Streisand – the 1971 album with the Lennon covers – is NOT her debut!!! I think it’s her 13th or so! Fun Fact: her ACTUAL debut in 1963, like that of the Beatles the same year, contained a version of A Taste of Honey
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Hologram Sam on May 25, 13:27 The teenagers in the 1930s newsreels had accents and patterns of speech that teenagers today don’t have. It wasn’t the recording medium or tape speed, it was their vocal mannerisms. There’s something recent I’ve noticed in my lifetime: the spread of “upspeak” where a young person ends each sentence like a question. There’s also something called vocal shreddding that I’ve noticed. It’s a fascinating subject.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Bill M. on May 25, 08:00 I remember listening to RRS with headphones the summer of 1973. I always liked Big Barn Bed.
  • Wanna Live-Tweet Something? Comment by Lambert Wolterbeek Muller on May 24, 21:56 FWIW – neither “US vs Lennon” nor “Nowhere Boy” are available on Netflix over here in The Netherlands 🙁
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Neal Schier on May 24, 15:52 @Sam Do you mean their patterns of speech and word choice or the actual sound of their voices in which even a younger person sounded older? If the latter, is some of that due to the recording medium and things like the tape speed? However…I know there were efforts by linguists starting in the 30s and 40s to go around and record the regional voices in the U.S., and those that I have heard snippets of (NPR or podcasts or wherever) certainly don’t sound like the way we talk today!
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Hologram Sam on May 22, 09:52 On the subject of the Beatles speaking “old” Liverpudlian… As a history buff, I’m endlessly fascinated with the subject of extinct accents. I remember watching a documentary on the Civilian Conservation Corps, FDR’s Great Depression legislation. I saw newsreel footage of young men, teenagers, being interviewed, and they sounded like old men! The accents, vocal inflections… reminded me of old men of my father’s generation, how they sounded in their 80s. My father worked in the CCC as a teenager, but I didn’t see him in the newsreel.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Hologram Sam on May 22, 09:39 I remember after my 100th listen to my Ram album, and the “who’s that comin’ round that corner, who’s that comin’ round that bend” ending being imprinted into my brain. And how satisfying it was a few years later, hearing Big Barn Bed on Red Rose Speedway… I was all “Ahh! He finished the song!”
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Nancy Carr on May 22, 05:37 Yes, it’s as if excess melody just sprouts out of some of McCartney’s songs. I unabashedly love the RRS medley, especially the xylophone interlude. Unexpected and very catchy. He also has some interesting unreleased instrumentals, like “Squid” and “Christian Pop.” No idea what either of those titles has to do with the songs— more weirdness. Oh, and “Spirits of Ancient Egypt” is also deeply weird.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Velvet Hand on May 22, 03:54 Ooh yes… that McCartney II extra deluxe thingy is insane. It’s got a 9-minute version of “Check My Machine” too! One of many lovely things about the RRS medley is how at the end, “Power Cut” reprises all the songs that have come before (a potpourri inside a collage?). The quilting you mention is there, I feel, from “All My Loving”, when the guitar solo goes off into an almost totally different song, or the start of “Here, There and Everywhere” which does not reappear, same as the 3/4 bit that opens “I’ve Just Seen a Face”… John did that too, but perhaps not so much as Paul’s influence on him waned.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Nancy Carr on May 21, 13:43 Thanks for sharing this, Velvet Hand! I’d add: * “Bogey Music” * Liverpool Sound Collage (collaboration with Super Furry Animals) * “Darkroom” * “Mr. H Atom” “You Know I’ll Get You” * “All You Horse Riders” / “Blue Sway” Those last two mashups appear as bonuses on the McCartney II reissue. In certain moods I would put the Red Rose Speedway medley (“Hold Me Tight” / “Lazy Dynamite” etc.) on this list as well. It’s interesting to me that McCartney clearly likes stitching song snippets together. He’s like a musical quilter in that way.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Velvet Hand on May 21, 12:54 “Paul’s weird shit” Reception Backwards Traveller Cuff Link Bridge On the River Suite Picasso’s Last Words (Drink to Me) Kreen-Akrore Fluid Strawberries, Oceans, Ships, Forest Lunch Box/Odd Sox 3 Legs Seaside Woman Hot As Sun/Glasses Baby’s Request Let ‘Em In Check My Machine C Moon We All Stand Together Give Ireland Back to the Irish (Version) Loup (1st Indian On the Moon) The Broadcast Ram On Bip Bop Hey Diddle Darkroom Pretty Little Head Secret Friend Morse Moose and the Grey Goose Cosmically Conscious Rinse the Raindrops (the last 4:20) Here’s the cover: https://i.redd.it/qfn3fle37s251.jpg (sorry for the reddit link)
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Hologram Sam on May 21, 10:17 I bought “Ram” when it was first released and really liked it. I loved hearing it with headphones. So many little sonic details, harmonies, stereo effects, etc. to enjoy. I remember the bad reviews, and it wasn’t considered as “cool” as McCartney’s first solo album. Brian Wilson spoke highly of it, though. Something about the overall sound that appealed to me. It wasn’t the Spector overproduction. Instead the sound was drier and closer, if that makes any sense.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Ben S on May 20, 16:14 The guys on the Take It Away podcast posited that it would have all sounded more like The Fireman / Electric Arguments, which I can certainly see. To me the criticism of Ram was the moment Paul started trusting fans’ opinion of his work more than critics’, and that’s why he had to keep his commercial flag so high – just to judge how he was doing, all through the ’70s and ’80s. Had the homespun wackiness of Ram been viewed as a post-Beatles artistic statement like All Things Must Pass, I think he’d have made a lot of weirder music in the ’70s. Though it was all still pretty damn weird.
  • John and Paul, Friends and Rivals Comment by Kir on May 20, 15:27 @Rose Decatur- I know this is an old comment, but well said. I wonder how much of Paul’s silence stemmed from his personality, and how much of it came from him feeling like he’d be a burden to others if he shared his issues?
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Elizabeth on May 20, 11:07 @Ben S – Good point. I think the criticism of this album really knocked Paul’s confidence and made him doubt himself – as it was intended to do. Would Wings have happened if Ram had been critically acclaimed? Probably not, as critical acclaim would have been more or at least as important to him as commercial success.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Ben S on May 20, 02:22 I often wonder: what would Paul McCartney’s solo career have sounded like had this record been praised to the heavens and not completely panned? Completely different, probably.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Kristy on May 18, 19:38 That is a great review– thank you! And the album continues to grow on me, also. I got into it later, but realized upon first listen that I’d heard a lot of the songs before. . It become pandemic-fun to watch reaction videos and there’s at least one really good one I’ve watched for the entirety of Ram: videos where younger people get patrons who pay them to watch/listen and react to music. There’s an entire reaction-video industry.
  • Happy 50th Birthday to McCartney’s “Ram” Comment by Velvet Hand on May 18, 11:21 The critics may have hated it, but lots of other people, especially in America, seem to have enjoyed it at the time — big album sales, US #1 in “Uncle Albert”… So… is there anyone on here who bought “Ram” in 1971 and would like to share their memories of how it affected them at the time? (If so – thanks in advance.) And on a vaguely related topic in that “Flowers In the Dirt” was my first contemporaneous Paul music purchase, does anyone know why there isn’t a single song from that LP on the fairly recent “Pure McCartney” comp? I mean, I’ve never felt that “FItD” is an brain-meltingly marvellous achievement, but… not even “This One” or “My Brave Face”? Was that because there was an archive collection “update” due out the year after?
  • Eddie Cochran Documentary on Arena Comment by Hologram Sam on May 17, 07:28 Will M, I agree Eddie could have done well in the ’60s if he kept writing good songs, and moved away from producers like Snuff Garrett. Here’s a quote from Sharon Sheeley: “Eddie had done a great Ray Charles song, ‘Hallelujah, I Love Her So,’ then went on the road. While he was gone Snuff Garrett went in and overdubbed some violins. These things are so obvious on there, they come screeching in over Eddie’s track. It’s so obviously overdubbed, and not only that, but it is right over Eddie’s guitar solo, which he played so brilliantly. That is why I love the British Eddie Cochran albums. Over there they took all of the overdubbing off of Eddie. You can hear the way he really cut it. Well, when Eddie came off the road and heard those violins, Eddie was so mad, he threw Snuff Garrett from wall to wall, I thought he was gonna kill him. […] This was two weeks before he went to England, and he never returned.” Buddy Holly had planned to open his own recording studio in Texas, where he was to produce his own songs. I’m not sure if his plans included working with Dick Jacobs again. (Jacobs was the guy in NYC who added the lush orchestration to Buddy’s last records.) Both Eddie and Buddy intended to move forward into the 1960s with as much creative control as they could take. There’s an interesting interview with Eddie Cochran on youtube. Johnny Bond is the interviewer: Bond: I’m gonna ask you a question, you may not want to answer it, maybe you don’t know the answer, but I’m gonna ask you anyway. How long do you predict that rock ‘n roll music will stay? Cochran: I think actually rock ‘n roll will be there for quite some time, but I don’t think it’s gonna be rock ‘n roll as we know it today. Bond: Do you think rock ‘n roll is something new? Cochran: No, I don’t. I think it’s been around for a long time, but nobody actually recognized it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_GbhDAkV0s The Beatles were fortunate in two ways: First, they were lucky enough to survive touring. No drivers or pilots killed them. Second, George Martin never took the liberty of adding additional instrumentation to their records without their permission.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Neal Schier on May 16, 17:26 Indeed Andrew. That would have perfectly fitted Nancy Mitford. I laughed at your reference to her as SWMBO was re-reading Mitford’s The Pursuit of Love a week or two past and could not help but read certain passages aloud. To both Andrew and Elizabeth: I find your regional variations of the use of the word dinner quite interesting. It reinforces to me as a life-long Anglophile how finely sliced some of these geographical and cultural gradations must be. The French historically ate the biggest meal at mid-day and used disner (later diner) to describe it. Souper was their term for the smaller evening meal–thus supper. The English nobility (and in turn the English language of course) adopted so much from French that I would have thought that dinner would have been the English U (a la Andrew’s tip of the hat to Mitford) term for the mid-day meal and supper for the evening repast. It sounds as if even an English noble of old could be at home in a Northern pub asking “What’s for dinner?” Somewhere are pictures of George Harrison eating Heinz Baked Beans so I guess whether one says dinner or souper/supper it all is equal if it tastes good!
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Laura on May 16, 13:41 The discussion of pardon vs what brings to mind an outtake of Paul recording Blackbird and saying “Pardon?” to someone. Pardon sounds FAR more refined and polite to my American ears.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Elizabeth on May 16, 08:43 @Annie M – Forthlin Road was a council house, so definitely working class. However, it was located in a middle class area. Allerton was/is lovely – very leafy, very suburban. But like all areas within UK cities (Knightsbridge in London perhaps being the only exception), it has pockets of deprivation. That said, the council estates were newer, less densely populated and overall much nicer in the 1950s and 1960s. Also, there was a much stronger work ethic among the working classes in general, and it was pretty shameful to be out of work. Well, that, and the fact that if you didn’t work, you didn’t eat. Things were very different.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Elizabeth on May 16, 08:06 But do you have dinner at lunch or tea time, @Allerton Andrew? Dinner at lunch time is a dead giveaway that someone is northern working class. Dinner at tea time not so much. I’ve lived in the south for years, so I find it really jarring now to hear anyone refer to lunch as dinner, though it still pisses me off when my kids say ‘what?’ instead of ‘pardon?’. To me, ‘what?’ sounds so rude and disrespectful (and to be fair my kids probably say it to wind me up), but it’s totally normal and acceptable for middle class kids in the south to say that. Just not in my house! It is true that class signifiers are more blurred now. RP has apparently been replaced by an ‘Estuary’ accent. Nearly all kids in London speak with this ‘Estuary’ accent, even little Prince George apparently. You can’t tell from someone’s accent whether they have been to a private or state school, though there are more subtle indicators, of course. Class tensions have definitely not disappeared however, and might even be worse than they have ever been – though perhaps it’s more accurate to say that tensions between the north and south are worse? I’m not sure, but I don’t recall things being as divided as this in the past. I doubt whether middle class London will ever forgive the north for Brexit!
  • The Merseybeat gang, circa 1962 Comment by LeighAnn on May 16, 03:17 John hanging out on a roof top with his cousins https://www.instagram.com/p/CO7EL3sr7K1/?igshid=1ge4l5n3ncuxr
  • Eddie Cochran Documentary on Arena Comment by Will M on May 15, 20:57 Sam, I’ve seen that commercial too and I wracked my brain trying to remember which car commercial it was on. It came on a few minutes ago and it was a Hershey’s commercial! I was thinking Eddie could have done well in the 1960s if he stayed with rock and roll and didn’t attempt a crossover to appeal to a larger audience. He wrote his own songs which would have given him an edge. Summertime Blues was kind of radical for the conventional 1950s as someone in the documentary mentioned. I like Buddy Holly’s rockers, but his later slow, love songs don’t do much for me.
  • "Reminiscing" Comment by Michael Gerber on May 15, 15:45 Me too! Lots of unfairly maligned 70s music out there (says this child of the 70s).
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Michael Gerber on May 15, 15:44 Yes, I think that’s exactly right, @Kristy.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Allerton Andrew on May 15, 08:32 @Neal There is a lot of truth in that, and I suspect The Spectator was channelling Nancy Mitford there, with her ‘U’ and ‘Non U’ (U being upper class). The example that tends to be rolled out is milk and tea – MIF (milk in first) being a terrible giveaway. Of course the truly classless drink tea without any milk, like me! So the Speccie was not really exaggerating, or not by much. A lot of that is a bit old fashioned, but some still sticks. One giveaway is what one calls one’s evening meal. ‘Tea’, ‘dinner’, ‘supper’ are all gradations on that scale. Although ‘tea’ tends to working class northern and ‘supper’ tends to be upper middle class/upper class southern. I’m a northerner who has ‘dinner’, so you can make your own mind up where I am placed on the social stratification. Yes, I would agree that post-war things have changed, and John would notice huge differences, but words can define class, but it’s more mixed now. Toilet is well used, lavatory much less so, and that once would have been a strong signifier. Other words still do make a difference – serviette or napkin? Given how many of our recent Prime Ministers have gone to the same school as each other and as that of PMs from centuries ago, it would clearly be a lie to say social class has disappeared, but it’s signifiers are possibly more blurred (RP is all but dead, even the Queen isn’t as posh as she was 60 years ago!). That ‘G’ is very north west England, I first noticed in Mancunians, but it’s also prevalent in Liverpool and my daughters have it too. I’m from further up in the North East of England and I don’t have that ‘G’.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Kristy on May 14, 08:49 Well, John had a Japanese wife with whom he traveled to Japan more than once, and they were eating macrobiotically in the early 70s (fish and rice), so it’s maybe not too adventurous that he’d develop a taste for sushi, I guess? I do remember sushi being a trendy “yuppie” thing in the US in the mid-80s. Think Claire in “The Breakfast Club.”
  • "Reminiscing" Comment by Kristy on May 14, 08:32 @Kevin, John was actually — supposedly — still canoodling with May until not long before his death. According to May. . I never noticed there was a thread on “Reminiscing.” Gotta admit, I love that darned song.
  • "Reminiscing" Comment by Kevin on May 14, 03:47 John was with May Pang for about 18 months from 1973 onwards – Reminiscing wasn’t written until 1978, there seems to some discrepancy here?
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Neal Schier on May 13, 22:22 @Allentron Andrew I once read in The Spectator (the British version mind) a quip that the English class strata are so well understood by the UK residents that one can tell where another fits in merely by how one adds a sugar cube to his/her tea. A purposeful exaggeration I would imagine, but were/are the gradations of class that finely sliced from WW2 onward? In other words indicators abound other than RP and 5he old school tie. Someone made an interesting remark regarding Paul emphasizing the final “g” in a word. I have noticed that from him and we hear it in the U.S. in the Northeast, but also in some surprising other locals. I have heard it from well educated and very well spoken Southeners. It has quite a geographical span from the UK through the U.S.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Michael Gerber on May 13, 22:05 @LeighAnn, IIRC sushi was rare in the US in the late 70s, even in New York. Its popularity really tracked with the emergence of the Japanese business/banking class a decade later.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Allerton Andrew on May 13, 12:48 @leighann – Food and The Beatles is a great subject and a wonderful to map their (and our ) social class mobility. From egg and chips, ‘curry and jelly and tea’, and Heinz Beans to vegetarian cook books and macrobiotic food. Quite a journey, and very very telling.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Allerton Andrew on May 13, 12:44 @Elozabeth – you are bang on re everything but especially Hamburg! Agree entirely about that shock. John had Art School to cover any gaps in conversation, so knew enough to bluff.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Allerton Andrew on May 13, 12:09 @Annie – previous two houses to Forthlin Road were in Speke (‘where the airplanes’ are as George memorably puts it in the Radio Clatterbridge interview in 1962), which is where George also lived. I have two friends, Paul and Mike, (not those ones) who grew up there, and although it’s a large council estate, it’s not quite as you’ve described, though it does have its moments..and yes, it’s light years from Allerton. On the rent point, if they did not paid rent it would be connected to Mary being a midwife and their living in a NHS owned house (and the number of people I’ve talked to from Speke who tell me Mary brought them or a sibling into the world would suggest she did nothing else but deliver babies night and day long after she had actually died). Certainly, people generally would pay rent to live in Speke. It was built between the 1930s and 1950s so fairly modern at that point. Re scholarships at the Institute – not sure, but it was not a fee paying school you just needed to pass the 11Plus, so no need for that kind of scholarship, they might well have had funding for uniforms, PE kit, lunch and books etc , but there was still bus fares, for 45 minute trip into town where a Secondary Modern was much more local and walkable. Grammar School was a divide of sheep and goat proportions, friendships ended based on that separation at 11. I have visited LIPA (housed in the Institute) a few times, to visit the library – I’m a librarian in a university- and to see the original entrance to the school is quite something, any Speke Ted must have been made to feel as if he was entering a new world quite apart from their previous experiences. It’s list of alumni is a who’s who of the great and the good.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Allerton Andrew on May 13, 11:45 @Michael – would love to!
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by LeighAnn on May 13, 01:46 Love the info @Allerton Andrew! I don’t know if this is a Beatles and Class thing but it’s something I find fun, but I love the anecdotes about the Beatles going to fine dining restaurants and then asking the chefs to make fish and chips or egg and chips, or John and Paul ordering pizza to a restaurant cause they didn’t like anything on the menu. Also Ringo supposedly taking a suit case of baked beans cans to India. They were definitely working class/middle class English boys in that regards lol. I think the most adventurous eating habits I’ve read is maybe John loving sushi, which was might have been considered fine dining and adventurous in the 80s I don’t know.
  • It happened in Toronto Comment by Michelle on May 12, 19:17 You have to admit though, there can’t be a more badass way for a rock star to go out. Sure beats dying in bathtubs or choking on your own vomit.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Michael Gerber on May 12, 13:48 Extra points for the Molesworth chiz chiz