• The Beatles and David Frost Comment by Michael Gerber on Sep 15, 19:50 Thanks for the head’s up, @ODIrony — looking into this now.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Mo on Sep 11, 14:29 I’m British and I’ve never heard of that!
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Mo on Sep 11, 14:23 For me, a working class Brummie, the main meal of the day is dinner whatever time we have it! We had our dinner at lunch time, as we had school dinners, and then tea in the evening. Once I started working I took sandwiches for lunch and had dinner at tea time! I’d never come across anyone having supper except in Enid Blyton’s Mallory Towers books!
  • Above Us Only Sky: New “Imagine” Documentary Comment by GavMunro on Sep 10, 21:56 I’ve written Curt’s remarkable life story, if you’d like more info please go to Homepage Curt Claudio | Finding Claudio Documentary (http://www.findingclaudio.com)
  • The Beatles and David Frost Comment by Odirony on Sep 10, 09:08 Odd, but none of your links are currently working. Videos unavailable, links seeming to go to different pages.
  • Prince Plays While My Guitar Gently Weeps Comment by Michelle on Sep 9, 08:35 Yeah. He probably used drugs as an excuse for his rant.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Dave on Sep 8, 17:39 Supposedly he really loved the Englishness of Bermuda when he visited there in 80, and the night before his murder Aunt Mimi confirmed that he said he would be visiting soon
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Dave on Sep 8, 17:30 Regarding Ringo and the suitcases of beans in India…that was more to due with Ringo sickly childhood. He was chronically ill with various things (peritonitis being one of them) and therefore had to adhere to a very bland diet as a result. He would’ve likely not been able to handle the native cuisine in India and decided to bring along something more familiar and safe
  • Prince Plays While My Guitar Gently Weeps Comment by Dave on Sep 8, 17:24 I believe they both continued to associate with Clapton afterwards too. King even cut an album with him in the late 90s
  • Prince Plays While My Guitar Gently Weeps Comment by Michelle on Sep 6, 08:37 With Clapton’s musical influences, and this being the first time I’ve heard that, I found it hard to believe that he’s racist so I googled it. I have now lost all respect for him. Muddy Waters and BB King must have been proud. Gross.
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by David on Sep 3, 18:52 Lol I believe it. I have seen clips of Beatles concerts that show massive throngs of people and you can see unconscious teenagers being passed through the crowd and into the arms of medical personnel. Thing is…that dam was ready to break by 1964. You’d had Elvis, but that was 1 man and he was sort of snuffed out for a while due to military service. But then you had the Beatles…4 of them. And right behind them was another band to evoke similar responses…and another…and another. It was a tidal wave because this sort of stuff had been bubbling beneath the surface for some time and these kids were feeling choked and suffocated by what society had become at that point. They were starting to ask uncomfortable questions about the treatment of blacks in society, of women and the roles they were forced into, about sex, drugs etc. And here were the Beatles singing to them, accepting them as they truly were, and supporting/advocating for the things they cared about but feared speaking out on
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by Dave on Sep 3, 18:42 Well what this guy was alluding to did come to fruition (Sexual Revolution/Liberation) Now of course it didn’t just start with the Beatles…there was Elvis several years before. But the Beatles really did kick things into high gear after Elvis(who was perhaps neutralized a bit due to his military service) with many others following. What this guy is lamenting is the lack of control (HIS generation losing control and influence) and chaos, promiscuity, and permissiveness that would come out of this wild behavior. Part of him I’m sure is also a bit jealous that he never got to experience a phenomenon like this when he was young, and thus wants to deny the current youth generation of what he missed out on. It was a tidal wave and it couldn’t be stopped. And thank God for that.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by David on Sep 3, 18:23 @Cazz. Yep. And what’s interesting is that very early on George was the super persistent bugger who wanted into the group in the worst way (I don’t think his bus rooftop audition actually sealed the deal) but he tagged along long enough and was impressive with the guitar despite Johns reservations about his age and him looking too much like a baby. Also to his credit he was the one pushing hardest to get Pete out and Ringo in, and that was a big moment in Beatles history where George was the driving force. But yea his demeaning and above it all/bored of it all attitude regarding the Beatles sometimes rubbed me the wrong way. Sometimes I wonder if his behavior was perhaps due to some sort of PTSD he had due to the insane mobbed at every turn years of Beatlemania. Ringo is on record as to loving it, having fun. But to someone else being trapped in a car while girls crawl all over it and the roof starts to collapse…another person may be fearing for his life. I do think that may have damaged George a bit
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Hologram Sam on Aug 31, 06:53 This discussion about accents reminds me of the old quote about the UK; where once “an Englishman couldn’t open his mouth without making another Englishman hate him”
  • Prince Plays While My Guitar Gently Weeps Comment by DD on Aug 30, 16:26 This was me, too. LeighAnn. I love hearing about the music. I think that’s why I enjoy Beatlegs so much is heat g how a song comes together. To a non-musician it is just magic.
  • Heroin and the Beatles’ Breakup Comment by jess on Aug 29, 00:35 “this video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by (You-Know-Who).” we’ve got to make copies of this stuff!
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Richard on Aug 25, 02:23 I believe Freddie had two sons from his late in life marriage. I can’t remember ever seeing anything about the younger, but the older, David, seems to be a professor of chemistry at the University of Glasgow. https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/chemistry/staff/davidlennon/ The family resemblance is unmistakable. Those Lennon genes were *strong*!
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by LeighAnn on Aug 20, 23:09 Random thought that occurred to me is that didn’t Fred Lennon have a son with his twenty year old girlfriend? John’s sisters get a lot of coverage but I don’t think I’ve heard anyone or read anyone who has gone into detail about the fact John has a brother. Like what happened to him? Is he still alive? Did John ever have a relationship with him? The only story I can recall is Fred telling him about having another baby and John, IMO understandably, unleashing on Fred and kicking him out.
  • Prince Plays While My Guitar Gently Weeps Comment by notorious_g_i_b on Aug 18, 09:16 If only! It would make a number of things much easier…
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Nancy Carr on Aug 17, 10:25 Sam, I tend to agree with you that things will largely stay the same, at least for the foreseeable future. I think Sean Lennon is carrying quite a burden, being the heir of his parents’ legacy and making the decisions about the estate. For all the privileges he has, I don’t envy him.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Hologram Sam on Aug 17, 08:35 From what I understand, Sean Lennon now has control of the estate. Yoko has stepped down, more or less. Question: Things will change? Things will stay the same? Personally, I think things will largely stay the same. The estate is a giant ocean liner now. Too big for sharp turns.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Lara on Aug 16, 16:48 I understood that the last time Paul saw Cynthia was when he drove out to see her and Julian after John left. The comments she made to him or at previous times could well have reflected her state of mind at the time – tired and lonely. John and Cyn were together for two or three years. She wasn’t a one-night stand. It was fame, drugs and differing goals that wrecked their marriage, not pregnancy. Half of that generation got married because they had to and many of them were happy and successful. It has been suggested on some of the posts on HD that John, on reflection in the late 70s, may have felt his happiest years were with Paul and the Beatles. He may have felt that about Cyn too. Why did he say those words? None of us really know what was inside his head. I do recall Paul saying in a separate interview that he didn’t think Cyn wasn’t a strong woman. Sorry, I can’t provide a source but I remember it. I think we all the know there is more than one definition of strong. I’ve been around long enough to know that Paul suffers from foot in mouth syndrome so it wouldn’t surprise me if he’s backtracked on some of his more unfortunate misogynistic comments. The popular perception in and out of the fandom that Paul and Linda were the perfect parents who produced amazing children is dubious and unfair. Their daughter, Heather, had serious mental health issues (attachment disorder like John?) and their son, James, by his own admission, turned to drugs at 16 before Linda became ill. He is not successful in the same way as other Beatle kids are. I don’t know much about his youngest child except she doesn’t seem to be part of the clan.
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by Nancy Carr on Aug 16, 14:30 I want to mention that Ann Hood recently wrote a charming middle-grades novel about a girl in love with the Beatles (Paul in particular) called “She Loves You.” It’s based in part on her own childhood love for the band. To so many young people of that era — girls especially — the Beatles represented freedom, including emotional freedom.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Laura on Aug 16, 11:19 Bad Paul! If he was thinking along the lines of a strong / bold personality vs. emotionally strong / resilient, he should have made that clear.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Nancy Carr on Aug 16, 11:16 Thank you, Marlo. I am grateful for the many people who have made substantive and thoughtful comments over the years. There’s plenty here to explore for anyone new — not just the posts, but the comment threads.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Marlo on Aug 16, 03:16 Michael, Nancy and Devin. I’m so sad to hear that you are closing your site down, but I can certainly understand the reasons. Toxic internet, irrelevant comments. You have provided such a valuable resource for Beatles fans that don’t want to discus if Paul and John had sex, but people just want to draw it back to that. Boring right? There’s so many other things to talk about. I’ll continue to see what’s happening here because it’s the best blog around.
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by notorious_g_i_b on Aug 14, 19:44 Chair-kissing? But that’s uncivilized!
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Michelle on Aug 13, 16:06 Paul didn’t imply or suggest that Cynthia wasn’t a strong woman. He flat out said she wasn’t on the Howard Stern show several years ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azq8ud8oiLY
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by Velvet Hand on Aug 13, 13:46 Well. I’m not American and/or over 70 and therefore cannot tell whether American Society has changed over the past 60 years or not. However, I work for an American company, and when I recently sent a number of emails to a business partner located in a Northern European country who goes by the glorious family name of “Kock”, I was dumb enough to wonder for a few days why I wasn’t receiving any replies. When I reached out to IT to find out whether anything was wrong with my email account, I was informed that my contact’s replies had been intercepted because the word “Kock” was considered “offensive” as per corporate guidelines for electronic communication. The only colleagues apart from myself who had a good old laugh about this were either fellow Europeans or exiled Europeans living in the US. The “genuine” Americans to whom I mentioned this kept quiet across the board.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Annie M on Aug 13, 12:32 Aha! Thanks Elizabeth, that clears it up a lot for me! 🙂
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by Hologram Sam on Aug 13, 06:10 As we all know, Western Civilization ended soon after. There are some today who would argue that it did. They’re all over the Fox network and other conservative outlets. They wish to return to their golden age of the 1950s or 1910s or 1850s, depending on who is doing the wishing.
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by Kristy on Aug 13, 05:44 Haha! They went into comas? OMG. (Thank you for sharing.) . Strangely, the girls do not seem to have felt as threatened. There’s a recent academic book by Christine Feldman-Barrett called “A Women’s History of the Beatles” that explores how some of the screaming fans were inspired by their experiences. . It’s interesting to me how fear of societal change — especially public expressions of personal freedom from marginalized groups (in this case women) — inspires some to exhort us to think “but what about the CHILDREN.”
  • The Beatles are a threat to our children, especially girls (August 1964) Comment by LeighAnn on Aug 12, 23:37 LOL thank you so much for sharing! I love these blast from the past clips. That gave me a good laugh. Especially the part with the bug analogy. Thoughts watching this is to chuckle at the patronising term “children” when majority of the “children” I assume would be in their mid to late teens early twenties. Also $5 a ticket in today’s money would be $44. The travesty that we could have seen the Beatles for less then $50 compared to the outrageous prices of tickets for today’s acts. You were underselling the Beatles Brian! I can only imagine the Beatles must have laughed amongst themselves and got a kick out that Judges “hysteria”. That being said I’ve recently been reading into and watching documentaries in regards to the Britney Spears Conservatorship case and even as recent as the early 2000s parents and the media were waxing puritanical about Britney showing her midriff turning all their young impressionable girls into sex crazed maniacs to the point one congresswoman said she should be shot. So perhaps parents just perpetually need someone to blame for corrupting their children.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by LeighAnn on Aug 12, 22:22 Paul didn’t imply Cynthia wasn’t strong. He implied that Cynthias idea of her and John’s future was, from his perspective, very different from John’s view of his own future. As @laura said she wanted John to settle down and be an old married couple and, from Paul’s perspective, that was not where John was ready to go. I agree it is unfair to say Cynthia is dull and matrimonial. She should absolutely be commended for the job she did in raising her son in difficult circumstances. But then all the Beatles and their wives/ex wives should be commended for the children they raised as other have said all the Beatles kids seem well adjusted, and don’t seem to have fallen into a trap of other celebrities kids who have gone off the wagon. I also appreciate how close they seem to be with one another socially. In regards to Julian and Sean one of the things I appreciate most, whether that is a credit to Cynthia, John, Yoko or all three, is the fact that regardless of any drama or personal feelings about their parents they have never let any of that impact their personal relationship as brothers. While I do think Cynthia and John loved one another- the letters John wrote Cynthia in Hamburg definitely suggest John loved her- I think it’s pretty indisputable that they were married out of societal obligation and necessity given Cynthias pregnancy. Both John and Cynthia have basically said as much. I believe Cynthia described their wedding day as feeling more like funeral. I think John was well intentioned and loved Cynthia and wanted to do the right thing by getting married- he also offered to marry his first girlfriend when she told him she was pregnant with another boys child- it’s just that he was likely in reality not ready or emotionally equipped for the responsibility especially at a time when he was becoming one of the four biggest celebrities in the world and all the fame fortune and temptation that comes with that. Had Cynthia not got pregnant, regardless of how they may have felt about each other I have my doubts their relationship would have carried on through Beatle mania- but it’s obviously just speculation. And having said that I do think Cynthia and her marriage to John is an incredibly important chapter in the Beatles story. Without Cynthia we don’t have some of John’s and the Beatles best songs- for instance Norwegian Wood, If I Fell, Across the Universe, Getting Better (with Paul) I believe even Please Please Me was inspired by or drew from his marriage. Then obviously no Hey Jude. And while I don’t doubt John would have taken LSD regardless, maybe he wouldn’t have felt the need to take as much and goes as deep as he did trying to escape the ennui he felt living in Weybridge and then maybe we wouldn’t have gotten Tomorrow Never Knows or Strawberry Fields or Lucy in the Sky etc.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Annie M on Aug 12, 20:32 Ahaaa, thank you, Elizabeth! 🙂
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Neal Schier on Aug 12, 18:07 @Dave Interesting observation. Now that you mention it, it is remarkable how strong many of of those accents were compared to today. I wonder if it is safe to say that there has been a leveling of accents across the country in the last few decades? Areas of the far Northeast and the coastal regions of North Carolina spring to mind as still having quite distinct accents and speech patterns, but everywhere else seems to be melding into uniformity.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Cazz on Aug 12, 15:23 Yes @Dave Looking at Harrison now he sounds so ungrateful. He had an extraordinary life, with plenty of money to sit around and tinker with the handful of good songs he wrote because of the Beatles. John and Paul could have gone off and been most of The Beatles we know without him. George on his own? Nothing to hold him back from working in a shoe store and playing guitar part time and not be anything really. No worrying about controlling his ‘appetites’ then. And he wouldn’t have been in the Wilburys and whining about them being better. Ugh. I read the other day that David Gilmour said the Beatles were fantastic and he wished he’d been in them. That’s the attitude! And he’s not bad on guitar either. Still George did put money into The Life of Brian so he gets points for that.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Elizabeth on Aug 12, 12:51 @Annie – It was normal for all walks of life to be represented at a grammar school, but it required a commitment from a working class family that was difficult and sometimes impossible. The kids who didn’t pass the 11 plus went to the local secondary modern, and they left school at 14 or 15. This meant that the family had an extra wage coming in, and it was very often relied upon. Kids who went to the grammar left school at 17 or 18 – that’s 3 or 4 years of extra support from families who were often struggling to make ends meet. And factoring in uniform costs, bus fares, etc, it was unaffordable for some families. My mum’s sister had to leave her grammar school when she was 14 because my grandfather insisted that she had to get a job. He just couldn’t afford for her not to be working. Having a child at a grammar school involved a sacrifice on the part of a working class family. That’s why I can’t get over the arrogance of George getting a place at the Inny and refusing to apply himself. That sort of attitude really was unusual – most people would have far too much respect for their parents to ever act like that. Paul’s respect for his dad was a lot more normal.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Dave on Aug 12, 12:18 I think I’ve read it too…where he says something “If xyz…I know Cyn and I would’ve made it” don’t recall the full quote Cynthia was an incredible woman and nothing but class and dignity. For what she ended up going through…she always kept her chin up and soldiered on and always tried to give John what she thought he needed. I’m not sure if Paul implied that Cyn wasn’t strong, I think his quote was that Cynthia told him that she just wanted to be the kind to bring John the pipe and slippers at the end of the day…where John needed someone to challenge him, intrigue him, and shake him up a bit.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Laura on Aug 12, 11:05 I don’t recall Paul implying that Cyn wasn’t strong, just him saying something along the lines of her having told him she wanted John to settle down and he didn’t see that happening. What comment(s) are you thinking of? . Although Cyn deserves plenty of props, it’s a bit much to say Julian is more stable and down to earth than the rest of the offspring combined. For the most part, I don’t see a particular lack of either attribute among them, which is pretty amazing considering all the wealth and fame – and scrutiny.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Lara on Aug 11, 17:00 I recall reading an interview with John in the late 70s where he said that if his life had been without fame and money, then he was sure that he and Cyn would have made it. This suggests that John married Cyn out of love and not duty. I feel sorry for Cynthia Lennon. She was a gifted artist who won her place at the Liverpool College of Art through merit. She had to give up her career when she became pregnant to John. I think it should be remembered that Cyn was a 23-year-old mother who had many a sleepless night with a new crying baby, then later with teething , potty training and all the other challenges of raising a young child. And all this mainly alone through the whirlwind of fame she never expected to have. Or getting accidentally dosed with LSD she never asked for. It’s unfair that Cynthia is seen as a dull, matronly woman with nothing of importance to give. I don’t know why anyone would expect an exhausted young mother to be able to carry an intelligent conversation with her husband or with anybody during the milieu of the mid-sixties. And shame on Paul for suggesting that Cynthia wasn’t a strong woman. She made a damn good job of raising Julian through extremely difficult circumstances. Personally, I think he turned out to be the most stable and down to earth than the rest of them put together.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Dave on Aug 10, 17:53 Have to say as a lifelong NY/NJ resident that whenever I see old films of New Yorkers speaking from the 50s…60s…70s, it astounds me just how heavy and pronounced that accent is. I was watching Frazier/Ali 1 the other day on youtube and couldn’t help but smile when I heard the ring announcer give the results in an almost cartoonish NY accent. But that’s how they spoke. Nowadays you hardly hear it anymore…it’s gotten so much flatter and milder
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Annie on Aug 10, 12:00 and my point with the tuition is that it sets up a strange dynamic between students, as some are there because of their family’s money/connections and some got there on scholarship. So the upper/middle/working class distinctions are (I guess?) more felt than in the more egalitarian British grammar school system which are based on test scores alone. That said tho… why do you say going to the Inny make Paul feel LESS working class? If it was normal and unremarkable for all walks of life to be represented, why would going to the Inny affect his class identity at all?
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by LeighAnn on Aug 10, 11:28 Also John was a teenager when he met Cynthia, and who you want when your 17 and who you want when 28 can be two very different things- especially if during that time you have gone from Liverpool to the biggest star in the world. If Cynthia hadn’t got pregnant it’s almost 100% likely the relationship would not have lasted past 1963 anyway. (Also didn’t he start dating Cynthia either right before or right after his mother died? I think that plays a part in the psyche of his relationship in the beginning as well) I seem to recall Paul saying an interview how Cynthia was talking to him early on in their relationship about how she was looking forward to settling down with John and Paul feeling sympathy for her because it was obvious that she didn’t get John and he wanted. I think John wanted to do the right thing and be the good father and husband, but it came at a time where his life was massively changing. To borrow a Hank Moody quote he was noble in thought, weak in action. And I don’t completely blame him or Cynthia for falling apart like they did. They were two different people who wanted two different things and whose lives were going in very different directions and who were likely much happier and better off apart then together.
  • Peter Jackson’s “Get Back”: Now Thanksgiving on Disney Plus Comment by Neal Schier on Aug 9, 20:35 Off topic from this thread, but pertinent to a previous discussion, I noticed that your webmaster seems to have fixed the redirect problem when one clicked on the Recent Comments tab. I have not had it occur at all this past week.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Dave on Aug 9, 16:37 I can kind of understand what drew John to Yoko. She was different, a bit controversial and strange, aggressive, incredibly smart, sexual, and obsessed with him. She was excitement coming into his life during a period which he felt alienated, unmotivated, and just lost as a person. He loved Cynthia at one point but I think her silent loyalty, perceived passivity, and what I would guess plainness just sort of made him lose interest over time. Cynthia was steady, agreeable, consistent, loyal. She loved John unconditionally for who he was from the beginning. John just couldn’t appreciate that for some reason. All these things about John’s fear of abandonment, being unloved, unwanted. Well here’s a person who loves you and never left you and you just walk away from it. Perhaps there were some things Cynthia could’ve done earlier to rattle Johns cage a little bit…he seemed to need that. To keep his interest I never had much respect or appreciation for Yoko’s “art”. To me it’s just not deep, interesting, or the least bit profound. She’s a very smart woman and I respect her tenacity but people like her I tend to see through from the very get-go. And I think John did too at the beginning, but he was in a vulnerable state and eventually she broke him down. On top of that he found her physically attractive which of course doesn’t hurt.
  • My Yoko Problem… and yours? Comment by Dave on Aug 9, 16:17 Yea, while I love George Harrison as a musician sometimes he can be a bit hard to take with some of his eye rolling, disregard, and distancing himself from the Beatles. For fans who would give anything to have lived his life, been in the Beatles and become a legend…it just sounds ungrateful. Almost like he’s too cool for the Beatles. George wanted the fame and success as much as the rest of them but I think just grew too weary and afraid of the crowds and disliked the constant pressure and attention…plus he was not always heard within the band. Paul and John never saw him as an equal. George was Pauls friend before he was Johns…and watched while Paul formed a bond with John and a legendary songwriting partnership. George wasn’t just along for the ride he was a contributor to it all, but the fact that he was always the baby of the Beatles and not taken as seriously as he should seems to have left some bitterness.
  • Peter Jackson’s “Get Back”: Now Thanksgiving on Disney Plus Comment by LeighAnn on Aug 6, 23:13 Thank you so much for sharing! I love that story. It just reminds me how Paul always says that their is a loving generous side to John or as Paul says he can be a big softie.
  • Beatles and Class Open Thread Comment by Annie McNeil on Aug 3, 19:29 @allerton Andrew: see this is why, to this American, the intricacies of what define class differences in Britain remain opaque. It would never occur to me that bus fare, or length of bus ride, would have any significance. And any “prestigious” school in the usa will inevitably charge tuition (but offer scholarships).
  • Peter Jackson’s “Get Back”: Now Thanksgiving on Disney Plus Comment by Hologram Sam on Aug 3, 17:13 I was just watching Antiques Roadshow on PBS and a woman showed a letter she’d gotten from John Lennon. I looked it up online and it turns out to be an episode from 2019. Anyway, the letter is from 1967, a few days after Brian Epstein’s death: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dNPd8Wv8gk She wanted him to be her big brother, and he signed it “Your big brother.”