• A quick note about celebrity journalism Comment by Lara on Dec 4, 21:29 Well said, Michael. There is a debate going on in Britain right now regarding Megan Markle’s latest appeal win over the press, that is, the balancing act between freedom of expression versus the rights of celebrities to keep their reputations untarnished. I think many of us have a jaundiced view of celebs. But the brick wall presents itself when any valid criticism, however mild, gets shot down in flames with accusations of hating, jealousy, racism, sexism, any ism. Hating or nitpicking for the sake of it is different of course. Somebody doesn’t like a face, doesn’t like a song/film/book (which we are allowed to anyway), thinks the person is a dick, or just plain dislikes them, whatever. The internet is awash with this idiocy. It’s picking out what is valid, or at least has some semblance of truth. Entrenched fan worship, not only with the Beatles, is ubiquitous so I can’t see this changing anytime soon.
  • A quick note about celebrity journalism Comment by De Junko on Dec 4, 21:22 An amazing article about the Beatles. I learned a lot about their music. But seriously, have you run out of ideas to discuss? What is the point of this blog anymore?
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 4, 20:42 I remember commenters on Breitbart News running with the Lennon was a Reaganite theory. It’s interesting how beloved/world famous celebrities are used to validate one’s own beliefs. It’s especially vindicating when this comes from the guy who wrote “Imagine” and “Give Peace a Chance”. He was also getting into televangelists even as he was writing “Serve Yourself”.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 4, 20:04 One can be born into privilege and be for social equality. Ever hear of philanthropy?
  • “Get Back” open thread Comment by Michelle on Dec 4, 19:57 Reply button not working: @Gabriella said: “Anyone else notice the (very quick) mimed blowjob?” Now that I’m through Part 2 and saw the whole India clip, it occurred to me that Paul does the same thing at the end of the ‘My Love’ video. Or am I imagining things? Great documentary so far! Kind of addicting even as it drags in parts. Didn’t know there were so many Lennon/McCartney songs that never saw the light of day (I never heard these titles before), or Lennon/McCartney/Harrison/Starr songs besides ‘Flying’ off of Magical Mystery Tour!
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Lara on Dec 4, 19:42 @Michael G. While I believe Peter Jackson when he said he was not influenced by any party, I do suspect he intuitively knew himself what to leave out to avoid controversy for the main players and their families. I don’t get the hate for Yoko, but I find the attempted rehabilitation of her, courtesy of 52 years of history and within the perspective of identity politics, disingenuous to say the least. Watching Get Back, if anything, made me feel sad, and I expected that, whatever problems they had, whatever Jackson did with the footage. I couldn’t watch all of it. For me it represented the end of an era. This was last time seeing them how they were: when megawealth didn’t exist, when crusading instincts were kept in check, when fans and media loved them for their sheer fabulousness, for the immense development of their musicality, and the growth of their personalities. You are right: money changes people. By the end of this documentary, it was the beginning of the end for all of them. I’m glad they broke up when they did.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 18:13 If I remember right, in that conversation with John, George says not only that he wants to do his own songs/work, but also that he thinks it would help the Beatles, give them a chance to not be so connected and let them spread out a bit. Which makes sense (and I have seen others wish would have happened): the Beatles do separate solo albums, and every so often come together for group albums. Anyway that’s what it seemed to me that George was thinking about here.
  • “Get Back” open thread Comment by Mick on Dec 4, 17:32 Hey, I think it’s possible that Beatles’ drug activity is overstated. First, people may exaggerate. Lennon told someone he thinks he took 1000 LSD trips. That strains credulity. (He would have to be doing acid roughly every other day from 1965-1970). And people have different experiences with heroin addiction. Some people succumb to the addiction completely, to the point that their every waking moment is consumed with getting high and figuring out how they’re going to stay high enough to ward off withdrawal. Obviously Lennon did finally suffer agonizing withdrawals but he was still functional the whole time he was using. (Also, he was snorting the drug, not injecting it. (If you’re gonna do H — which you should not! — at least don’t put in your veins.)
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 16:57 While we are on the topic of feminism and the Beatles women, can I say the most infuriating moment for me in Get Back was when Michael Lindsay Hogg tried to mansplain to Linda- Paul McCartney’s future wife and current muse- that he was a bigger Beatles fan then she was and why she was wrong. Like honestly I would have forgiven Linda in a heart beat if she decked him lol.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 16:51 Much better to hate someone for exisiting and blaming her for what was clearly the issues between men.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Tasmin on Dec 4, 16:26 Lara, Regarding the narrative changing on Yoko, I think she’s still viewed predominantly negatively, at least on the Washington Post comment board. I was on a story there yesterday about “Get Back”, and the general consensus was that while no one thought she was the sole cause of the breakup, she wasn’t seen as completely innocent either. There was only one or two Yoko defenders. As someone on this blog pointed out, there is so much information about Yoko, and her horrible behavior towards Julian, and not giving John phone calls from Paul, Mick Jagger, etc…. that I don’t think she’s ever going be seen as innocent. I know you said Paul hasn’t gone to the “American Right”, but from everything I read, he seems to still be a Liberal. That’s the impression I get from his support of Obama, Hillary Clinton, and the anti-Trump song he wrote.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 16:20 Replying to @Anna: I had no idea George left the meeting because Yoko talked for John. I wish Jackson would have mentioned that, but he did seem to take a very “hands-off” approach, giving only the facts. Perhaps I should have known that anyway. But was it the only reason George left the meeting? I’m genuinely curious.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Peter Deville on Dec 4, 16:06 Cilla Black! Ha. Sorry, your argument is risible and contemptuous. Actually talk to people from Liverpool about how they feel about Thatcher. And failing that, actually look into the Thatcherites’ opinion on Liverpool in the 80s. Here’s a hint – google ‘managed decline’. Then google ‘Hillsborough’. Nuff said. I came here for Beatles. I’m leaving because of the ill-informed agenda-driven white noise.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 15:55 Also, @Michael, please speak more about Paul being addicted to work! I definitely saw this in “Get Back” as well–it’s striking. The man just can’t stop. He also clearly (I think) uses work to avoid underlying issues/anxieties.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 15:52 Michael, I just want to say that even though you may be tired of harping on addiction, I, as someone who was very personally and directly affected by abuse (and can testify to just about everything you’ve said here, including the addict’s unpredictable behavior/appearance–like being two people in one), really really appreciate your harping. So many people are not aware of how subtle and hidden addiction can be. Many, many people are phenomenal at hiding it. So I appreciate you and others making the signs and dangers more known.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 15:43 Michael, re: George, I do have to say that he came off a lot calmer, submissive, and gentle than I expected. He also seems to be trying to get everyone to work together, as you say. I suppose because we don’t see much of him talking in LIB, and I’m so used to reading/hearing interviews with him in the 70s that sound so bitter and negative, but he really seems like a gentle, sensitive guy here, who has a hard time standing up for himself in the presence of incredible writers like Paul and John. That being said, I do agree that his just leaving the band was a bit dramatic. But overall he wasn’t nearly as bitter as I expected him to be. (Maybe he just hid it well.) I also think he had fantastic clothes and guitars. I love the rainbow guitar in particular.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Matt on Dec 4, 15:40 @LeighAnn It isn’t that other celebrities don’t have hired help. It’s that, as Elizabeth said, Yoko refers to her help explicitly, out-loud as “servants.” It’s in the Green and (I think) Seaman books. Yoko views her subordinates (and, to be honest, most people in general) as subsisting to serve her. Likely it is a result of her upbringing. Yes, the people working for her are getting paid. But the semantic difference between “servant” and “employee” is wide.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michael Gerber on Dec 4, 15:38 @Lara, “But back to the men – all of them swung to the right within a handful of years of this film.” Vast fortunes have a tendency to do that. I’ve always found JL’s 1980 comments about Reagan eye-opening as to his possible future. I don’t think he was gearing up for a lot of philanthropy. “The latest Guardian review of Get Back demands the world owes Yoko Ono an apology – this based on less than three recorded weeks from the Beatles eight year career. Judging from many of the supportive comments, this is now the new narrative it appears.” Well, we knew this pre-release, right? And sure, everybody go apologize to Yoko, what’s the harm? Amazing how all these billionaires want to be loved — yet being lovable is pretty much incompatible with amassing and protecting a great fortune. But let’s apologize anyway, she’s old and everybody makes mistakes, and humility is good for the soul. SORRY YOKO! HOPE YOU’RE FEELING BETTER! xo
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Erin on Dec 4, 15:28 I finally finished all three episodes, and I’m sure a lot of my thoughts have already been stated above, but I wanted to share them before reading others’ so I don’t change my opinions prematurely. And, I figure if anyone will be accepting of my Beatles obsession, it’s you all here. Obviously the film quality and color are amazing. Other things I particularly liked were John’s sense of humor and both his and Paul’s playing with words and sounds throughout—they’re both very good at improvising and changing things up on the fly—and Ringo’s humor. This film, along with the Beatles biography I recently read, really make me want to find a good biography of Ringo, as he is often overlooked but seems like such a happy-go-lucky, easygoing, kind person. It was also very fun to see how the songs evolved from simple melodies with a few uncertain lyrics, to complete songs with harmonies and complex lyrics. I really enjoyed getting to see the Beatles’ creative process, even if it was probably a lot different (tense) than in earlier years. I found John’s behavior at Twickenham vs. Abbey Road striking. Obviously everyone feels more comfortable at Abbey Road, which could explain why John opens up, but also, at Twickenham he is noticeably quiet, even sort of zoned out. I’m assuming this was due in large part to his drug use, but the 180 at Abbey Road makes him almost like a different person. John at Twickenham is pretty depressing to see. However, there are other times he just seems sad too—like when asked about his relationship with Paul. And there are certain moments, it seemed to me, when he lights up a bit when talking one-on-one to Paul. I really tried to go into the film with no expectations, but I couldn’t help notice the different energy between John and Paul, compared to other one-on-one interactions. They just had a connection that was unique, and it seemed to wake something in John up, even at Twickenham, even with the drugs. Am I reading too much into this? Paul’s behavior is also strange at times. Firstly, he looks incredibly sad throughout much of the film, which perhaps was due to tiredness, but I honestly think was more than that—at certain moments he looks really desperate, I’m guessing because of the impending breakup. But more than that, he seems to go from pseudo-manager and cheerleader for the band to quiet, unresponsive guy over and over. I see this in particular when John says he’d like to do the concert, and they should do it—he’s very insistent, and seems energized—while Paul sits slumped and mumbles, “Hm” in response. He looks very distracted/disengaged/uncertain, like something more than the show is bothering him. I’m attributing this to his distress that he couldn’t stop the Beatles from breaking up (and maybe pot?), but his apathy/tiredness/whatever it is at times is startling. One of my favorite moments is when Paul, John, Ringo, Lindsay-Hogg, and Linda discuss the band after George has left. They almost seem to admit, straightforwardly, that the band is breaking up! For once it seems they are all being almost-straight and honest with each other—not dancing around issues. Although they don’t really get anywhere. Paul and John’s “hidden-tape recorder-in-flowerpot” conversation is fascinating as well. I assume there is a bit more context at the beginning and end, which I would like to hear, but what we do hear surprised me, as John and Paul are a lot more straightforward with each other than I would expect, considering all the unspoken tension that lasted between them for years. John in particular seems quite reasonable, just trying to be honest. They don’t interrupt each other as much as I expected either. But again, there seems to be no resolution, no decisions made. This whole conversation also makes me wonder how many people will come away from this film thinking that the Beatles’ breakup was caused in large part because John and Paul were fighting over leadership of the band. Leadership/ego issues were definitely part of the breakup, but I don’t think they were the only or even most important reasons (but of course we can’t see that in this film). What we do see, however, is a long discussion/monologue (?)? about India from Paul. Was this in Let It Be? I seem to remember seeing part of it somewhere, or hearing Paul say these things, but I’m not sure. Regardless, there are some interesting comments—Paul focuses on several specific John moments (“You did this” “You looked like this”), and he seems to address John a large part of the time he’s talking. John is also staring at him, quite intensely. The most intriguing moment in all of this, to me, is that when someone (Lindsay-Hogg I think? I can’t remember, there were so many people) asks, after Paul has talked in-depth about the India film, “What did happen?” Paul leans back, looks up and away, runs his hands through his hair and says, “I don’t really know.” Excuse me, Paul? You might not know everything that happened to everyone internally there, but you have to know some things. Here is Paul being vague again. Maybe he doesn’t know, but I also get the sense he’s not revealing everything. Not that he has to—I just find his avoidance and vagueness remarkable here. Again, maybe I’m reading too much into it, but it struck me. George’s comment about them not finding themselves is interesting too: does that mean he didn’t find himself in India either? Then was the trip a failure for him? Does he think fame made them not-themselves, false versions of themselves, fake people? That’s certainly understandable, but there seems to be more bitterness there. The statement certainly gives one a lot to ponder. Those are my big takeaways from the film, other than the positive spin, which I expected. I did appreciate that certain moments of tension were included too, though. (And Heather’s impersonation of Yoko is hilarious.)
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Lara on Dec 4, 14:47 Exactly, hence my irony. It’s demeaning. The only woman seriously under discussion in this documentary, and her role, is Yoko Ono. As much as I disliked Margaret Thatcher, you must be seriously seriously kidding to compare it to the blitzkrieg of Liverpool. There is more than enough photographic evidence online if anyone cares to search. Famed fellow Liverpudlian, Cilla Black, literally born into a pile of rubble (as was Ringo Starr) was a stout Thatcherite. But back to the men – all of them swung to the right within a handful of years of this film. Not the American Right, mind, we know that, but … . one of the things that irks me is how, in particular, Paul, speaks out about American politics but remains strangely quiet about what goes on in Britain. At least Ringo has admitted to being a Brexiteer. The latest Guardian review of Get Back demands the world owes Yoko Ono an apology – this based on less than three recorded weeks from the Beatles eight year career. Judging from many of the supportive comments, this is now the new narrative it appears.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 14:04 The Crown comment was a joke- If there were emoticons I would have put a winky face to emphasis the point but cest la vie.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michael Gerber on Dec 4, 13:42 In general, @LeighAnn, you want to take celebrity journalism with a (or many) grains of salt.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michael Gerber on Dec 4, 13:31 In general, don’t believe TV retellings of history. Events have to be compressed and reordered for maximum drama, and the natural gaps in the record have to be filled in for purposes of the story. Here’s a discussion of Thatcher, The Queen, apartheid and The Crown.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 12:22 Speaking of one of my favourite tidbits I’ve heard is how two young kids broke into John’s apartment as a dare and instead of calling the police, John hired them instead, which just feels so typically like something John would do lol. It was mentioned in this article that featured in Playboy a few years after John’s death: https://www.vickisheff.com/john-lennon-yoko-ono/
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Peter Deville on Dec 4, 12:09 Massive eye roll here. Can the Beatles’ wives be women in their own right instead of templated against politicians’ spouses (cringe)? Ironic that the thread has got sidetracked with bloody Thatcher, who did more to damage Liverpool than Madolf Heatlump (who only had one). Yoko forever, Thatcher never.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 11:54 I have never heard Yoko making “servants” sleep on the floor nor do I believe it. John and Yoko had hired help as did and do most celebrities, including all the other Beatles.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Elizabeth on Dec 4, 06:18 Yoko, a supporter of social equality? She had (has) a houseful of servants, referred to as such, @LeighAnn. One of them slept on a mat outside Sean’s bedroom. Margaret Thatcher’s housing policies did a lot of damage in the long term, but I’m not sure that was her original intention. By enabling people to buy council houses at below market value, she was trying to increase social mobility. Of course, the housing stock wasn’t replenished, and then Blair’s immigration policies led to a massive population increase (I think London’s population has increased by about a quarter in the last 20 years), which in turn created a housing crisis. But I don’t think Thatcher intended that to happen. As for Yoko, she was born into privilege, and I think it’s highly unlikely that she’s ever given social equality a second thought. She’s done a great job of selling herself as an oppressed victim, and luckily for her the political climate has shifted in her favour, but I bet her servants don’t see her like that.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Lara on Dec 4, 01:02 I was being facetious @Leigh Ann. Regardless of politics, Thatcher earned the sobriquet “The Iron Lady” despite constantly quoting St Francis of Assissi (peace and love).
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 4, 01:00 The irony. Another thing Margaret Thatcher also fought against the push, including from members of her own party and if biographers (and The Crown writers) are to be believed even from the Queen, for a hard line against South Africa and their apartheid policy. She deserves acknowledgement for being an example of a woman in a mans world and for being unapologetic or demure about her position. But a feminist she is not and people I know who are from the UK have told me there are parts of the UK that still feel the effects of her harsh economic policies.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 3, 22:39 Reminds me of Phyllis Schlafly, who was instrumental in shooting down the Equal Rights Amendment by championing housewives while she herself went to law school and ran for Congress.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 3, 22:29 @Matt – Agree 100%
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 3, 20:09 Perfect! Of course I was thinking of Yoko as Hillary, and Jane as Jackie. Well done.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 3, 19:14 Margaret Thatcher despite being a woman in power did not support feminism, believed in traditional roles for women, did not advocate for women in any of her policies or roles for female members in her cabinet, did not support social equality, and despite being a woman generally seemed to conduct her policies around the same kind of things typical of patriarchal government- War, free market capitalism and competition, greed is good etc Not sure how that relates to Yoko even in a casual comment way at all myself.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Tasmin on Dec 3, 17:11 Great comment Michael. I think George got frustrated with Paul, because Paul wouldn’t confront John. As you said, Paul was protecting John, and knew confronting him wouldn’t work. Michael G has written much about the dysfunctional, addiction family dynamics of the Beatles. I think it is spot on. I’m glad this emotional side of Paul is being shown, because I think some people think he was all business. He keeps his feelings in check, but underneath he’s a bundle of nerves. I do think he suffers from an anxiety disorder.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Tasmin on Dec 3, 16:12 This is good!
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Matt on Dec 3, 15:23 @LeighAnn That’s why when Lennon found slights all over RAM (not just Too Many People), I’m inclined to believe he wasn’t just being paranoid. I’m sure there were lots of little references from Paul that only the two of them would ever get.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Lara on Dec 3, 13:10 First Ladies? Hmm – a little American cultural imperialism here. Half of these women were British with British men living in Britain. I don’t think any of them past or present were truly equal either. Any Margaret Thatchers here surrounded by her grandees? Yoko?
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 3, 08:55 Love this. Well stated and so true!
  • Paul McCartney: The Lyrics Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 3, 06:11 I’m not sure if this is Paul reading a passage from his book or just him talking about Here Today but it’s the sweetest saddest thing. https://twitter.com/bbcradio4/status/1465995008960512001?s=21
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Daniel Moss on Dec 3, 05:38 Cynthia – Lady Bird Johnson. Loyal but humiliated and mistreated by the husband she loved. Jane – Jackie Kennedy. Stayed classy and stayed silent, despite everyone else kissing and telling. Linda – Michelle Obama. An equal partner to her famous husband, supports growing vegetables. Pattie – Nancy Reagan. Formerly a minor success in showbiz in her own right, into astrology, inspired a classic song (Something/Nancy With The Laughing Face). Olivia – Eleanor Roosevelt. Spent her later life jealously guarding the estate and reputation of her husband. Heather – Betty Ford. Sometimes embarrassed her husband, but did a lot of pioneering charity work. Yoko – Hillary Clinton. Loved or hated depending on your viewpoint. Feminist icon who ironically relied on the achievements of her husband. Maureen – Barbara Bush. A teenage bride who failed to persuade her eldest son not to follow his father’s profession. Barbara – Melania Trump. Former model who hasn’t divorced her husband, despite expectations.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Anna on Dec 3, 04:26 If you are interested in hearing more of both Paul’s defense of John&Yoko and the lunchroom conversation happening on the 13th of January I suggets this webiste: https://amoralto.tumblr.com/getback. It’s a fantastic source with audio and transcripts of the Get Back sessions divided per days.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 3, 04:00 @Michelle the amount of times John and Paul use their lyrics or sing to each other seemingly to communicate definitely makes me understand why both of them had a melt down over Too Many People/How Do You Sleep lol
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 3, 03:35 Also bonus in the same scene Mr When I’m Sixty Four with a massive love of old time tunes McCartney snapping “when ever we get together to play we are like a bunch of fucking age pensioners talking about the past” LOL
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by LeighAnn on Dec 3, 03:31 @fox on George and John m- I’m doing my first rewatch of part 1 and I have to admit I got a chuckle at the fact that during the scene where Michael is talking about what kind of show they are going to do, he asks what’s the biggest charity and Mr Concert for Bangladesh Harrison quips “Charity begins at home” and then when Michael asks what they are doing the show for Mr The dream is over Lennon says “Communication. Televisions about communicating. I just want make people smile. That’s what I’m doing it for.” Lol I just found that contradiction fascinating.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michael Gerber on Dec 3, 00:36 John’s use of language is really unique, especially when he creates runs of portmanteaus one after the other. He’s so quick with it, and does it so incessantly, it’s a bit like a person who can multiply numbers effortlessly or some other sort of fundamentally neurological gift. And I think it was essential to his lyric writing process, and probably his music writing one too. It’s a aural subroutine that’s running all the time in the background of his mind.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Neal on Dec 2, 20:04 Point taken @Kristy. I should have used a better example. I should have also excluded Neil and Mal from my implication of courtiers who felt obligated to laugh. They were in the innerest part of the circle and felt, I imagine, no obligation to play the fawning audience. I agree @Michael that John’s wordplay was not a joke. That is perhaps why I enjoyed it so much and certainly more than any straight joke from the others. His utterances seemed to be just a constant tumbling of thoughts and ideas and is why I keep thinking of it as part of the fabric of his existence. He very well might not have even been aware of it most of the time. I particularly enjoyed the times he riffed with alliteration. I couldn’t imagine that ever coming from the others, yet it is part and parcel to him. John is rightly admired for many reasons, but it is his verbal dexterity that I find to be the most compelling aspect of his personality.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 2, 18:17 What were the great songs that Paul gave away in ’62/’63, and what were the ordinary songs they put on their first two albums instead? Curious…
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 2, 18:05 I’m not sure if anyone here mentioned Paul singing Strawberry Fields at one point, which I learned on tumblr somewhere.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 2, 17:59 I can’t wait to watch this. Your spoilers aren’t ruining it for me LOL. By all accounts, John still displays deep affection for his Beatle mates in the doc.
  • “Get Back” Halftime Report Comment by Michelle on Dec 2, 17:52 Nah, I was just being facetious. I only know that Paul said he had seen John around before they actually met. It could have been as early as 1956. It doesn’t appear that John remembered seeing Paul before the official meeting.