John Lennon’s hair…

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Michael Gerber

Publisher at The American Bystander
is Blogmom of Hey Dullblog. His novels and parodies have sold 1.25 million copies in 25 languages. He lives in Santa Monica, CA, and runs The American Bystander all-star print humor magazine.
Michael Gerber
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Lennon Spain 1966

Lennon, post-shearing, 1966

is worth more than your car. (Probably.)

A lock of Lennon’s hair clipped in 1966 for his role in “How I Won The War” has been sold at auction for a whopping $35,000. (That is one smart “German hairdresser.”)

No word as to whether the “U.K.-based collector” is planning on cloning Mr. John, like a Canadian dentist is attempting. Dr. Michael Zuk bought a tooth, and thinks that entitles him to the whole thing. He says he wants to raise John II as his own son, keeping him away from booze and cigarettes. (And, perhaps, conceptual artists? At least until he cuts a few records?)

“You did what to me? And then you cloned me so you could still have me around? You people are crazy.

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12 Comments

  1. Avatar Hologram Sam wrote:

    everything will be fine until he auditions for The Voice:

  2. Avatar Water Falls wrote:

    Yoko auctioned off a lot of John’s belongings, instead of just giving freely to John’s firstborn son, the items he asked for and eventually had to purchase from her or those who bought those items at auction. Now there are those who bought his tooth, and his shorn hair, from those who sold them. And too Yoko has been selling his image on bric-a-brac, whatnots, knick knacks, etc. Had he been buried, I suppose there would be those who would dig up, desecrate, plunder. If it is possible, his ashes would spin. I hope his soul rip.

  3. Avatar Rob Geurtsen wrote:

    Aren’t the real questions
    1) who owns which DNA, and what can we do with DNA found?
    2) The idea that cloning with John’s DNA means cloning the artist or person or personality is not even science fiction.

    Question two and speculation in that direction is fully nonsense. The environment in which the physical body develops has so much influence that it is unlikely to create a person or personality similar to the John Lennon we know, even if he looks similar or very much alike.

    playful thought: how come and why would the cloned Lennon display the same indecent behavior, apparently void of empathy, as the original unkind Lennon who made jokes about spastic or otherwise disabled people?

    • Avatar Beasty Glanglemutton wrote:

      The environment in which the physical body develops has so much influence that it is unlikely to create a person or personality similar to the John Lennon we know

      Simple, you just create a “Boys from Brazil” type scenario, where you recreate all the conditions of John’s early life. Of course, a hell of a lot of people are going to have to die along the way, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

    • Karen Hooper Karen Hooper wrote:

      “Who owns which DNA, and what can we do with DNA found?“

      Great question, Rob. Trying to “clone” John is so crazy as to not be worth discussing, but it does raise some interesting questions. Here in Canada we have something called the DNA Protection Act, which expressly restricts the sampling of DNA for law enforcement purposes. That dentist might be in a world of trouble. 😉

  4. Avatar Ruthie Rader wrote:

    Thank you for that funny video, Hologram Sam. I like it. As for cloning John Lennon: I thought that happened when Julian was born. But maybe not. I do know that many people wonder what would have happened if John never got shot. As it is, when the bullets left the gun…many people felt the hit. I suppose it is a normal human reaction to want to bring someone back who died too soon. But that will never really happen. So I suppose the lesson here is to cherish the living who offer amazing things to this world. And do our best to contribute amazing things of our own, after those living have gone. Even if it just makes somebody laugh. In our world today…we need a whole lot more humor! I rest my hair…er…case.

  5. And you could’ve seen this coming:
    The buyer of the hair is now selling it off strand-by-strand. A half-inch strand sells for £399, and comes on a card which reads “Imagine no possessions.”

    (Just kidding. I added that last part.)
    [h/t Linda S!]

  6. Avatar Water Falls wrote:

    I was just thinking. How do we know this piece of hair lock is really John Lennon’s?
    It may be, but how would anyone be able to prove otherwise after all these years, decades? What was it that P. T. Barnum said? “There’s one born every minute!”

  7. Avatar Craig wrote:

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen that photo of John before. I really like it. Thanks for the view, Mike.

    • Karen Hooper Karen Hooper wrote:

      It was taken back at the hotel while John was filming How I Won The War. I like it too.

    • I liked it, too, Craig. It was one I’d never seen before.

      Changes in hair often are a way people mark big life changes — and given the role that hair played in the Beatles’ story, getting his locks cut off for “How I Won The War” must’ve been quite a psychological moment for John.

  8. Avatar Michael Gerber wrote:

    Here’s another neat photo of John from the shearing period…

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